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Posts Tagged ‘rate my doctor’

Some doctors are totally disgusted with the profusion of online doctor rating websites.  I understand why they feel that way.  As great a career as medicine is, it seems horrible to have to worry about online doctor ratings on top of the years of training, the continuing commitment to ongoing medical education, the trials and tribulations of running an office, and the stresses of caring for sick patients.
Are online doctor rating websites like DrScore.com the bows for patients’ arrows at doctors?  That’s not the way I think of it. DrScore is more of a vase to display to the flowers that patients give the doctors that they appreciate.  The vast, vast majority of patients love their doctors, and online rating is way to make those patients visible.  When doctors see the esteem they are held in by patients, I think it will help doctors renew their commitment to giving patients great medical care.

Doctor’s Day is coming March 30. Give your doctors some flowers for their vase by rating them online at DrScore.com.

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2010 Annual Report Card Highlights

The 2010 Annual Report Card is based on 54,191 patient ratings collected at DrScore.com, the online patient satisfaction survey site, during the year 2010. The results provide insight into the strengths and weaknesses of doctors in meeting the needs of their patients.

  • The average rating for all physicians is 7.1 out of 10, a slight decrease from the average rating in 2009 of 7.4, but still indicating an overall high level of patient satisfaction.
  • More than 66 percent of all physician ratings were 9.0 or higher, and 58 percent of all ratings were a perfect 10.
  • The average rating for physicians with 20 or more patient ratings is 9.1 out of 10, which is a slight increase over 2009’s average rating of 8.9.
  • Across the board of patient ratings, patients gave physicians more high scores in 2010 when compared to 2009 both overall and on all aspects of treatment.  Physicians with more ratings had higher average scores.  The subscores that increased from 2009 to 2010 included waiting time, doctor’s friendly/caring attitude, time spent with the doctor, following up on test results and treatment success.
  • Wait time continues to be an important driver of patient satisfaction. This year’s survey found that patients 65 and older have become less tolerant of longer wait times.  In comparing ratings for patients who waited an hour or more with those who waited 15 minutes or less, DrScore found;
  1. Ages 65 and over experienced a 37 percent drop (8.8 to 5.5), a significant difference compared to 2009’s 27 percent decrease
  2. Ages 35 to 64 had a 31 percent drop (8.3 to 5.7), close to 2009’s 32 percent decrease
  3. Ages 34 and under experienced a 40 percent drop (8.3 to 5.1), slightly higher than 2009’s 37 percent decrease.

 

  • There were little differences in patient satisfaction between men and women. In general, men tended to rank treatment success and treatment follow-up higher than other aspects, while women ranked thoroughness and friendliness higher.

 

  • In general, patients rated doctors higher on overall communications in 2010.  Close to 60 percent of the patients who completed the survey gave their doctors a perfect 10 for
  1. How well the doctor answered patient questions (61 percent)
  2. The extent to which the doctor included the patients in decisions about care and treatment (59 percent)
  3. Instructions on how to take care of the patient’s illness or health condition (59 percent)
  4. Thoroughness of exam at check-up (58 percent)

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A few key messages about online doctor ratings at DrScore.com.

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As we approach the end of the year, I always find it useful to make a list of reasons why we believe online physician rating is an important tool for health care practitioners (and, of course, why we think DrScore is the best!). Here are a few thoughts on why DrScore is a great tool for both consumers and doctors:

A Site for Consumers

  • All doctors need feedback from their patients. I created DrScore.com because I had learned from my own patient feedback that there is much more to great medical care than giving the right diagnosis andthe right treatment. Doctors care about their patients, but they have to make sure the patient knows that they care.
  • As physicians, we want to deliver the best care possible, and across the board, patients are telling us we’re doing a great job.  It’s a fact that often gets lost when the media only focus on the negative experiences that patients have.
  • When patients are satisfied with their physician interaction, they are more likely to follow doctors’ orders. Patient satisfaction leads to improved adherence to prescriptions, better outcomes and ultimately reduced health care costs.
  • DrScore.com is the only Web site where patients can rate their physician and know that their doctor, if he or she is a subscriber, is reviewing their feedback and  taking action. Patients complete an anonymous, validated, online interactive patient survey that are then distributed to their physicians on a monthly basis. These survey cover everything from accessible parking to waiting time and treatment access to time spent with the physician. In turn, physicians can view summaries of their ratings through the site or receive more detailed reports that allow them to “drill down” into the data to improve patient care.
  • Consumers can also use DrScore.com to find a doctor in their community. Doctors are categorized by specialty and community

A Site for Doctors

  • DrScore is a physician rating Web site that physicians send their patients to with the ultimate goal of enhancing the quality of patient care. The site is not a vehicle for selling advertising or a forum for bashing doctors. It’s about helping patients and doctors have the best medical care experience.
  • With DrScore, physicians don’t have to hire a research firm to conduct patient satisfaction research. Instead, they have year-round access to summaries of their ratings through the site and detailed reports that allow them to “drill down” into the data to improve patient care. The data is extremely detailed and actionable, and allows physicians to pinpoint exactly where improvements in patient care need to be made.
  • Doctors should be encouraging their patients to do online ratings in order to determine a truly representative score and find out where improvements need to be made. In today’s customer-service oriented world, positive feedback is equally important so doctors will know what they are doing right and continue to act upon it.
  • Data from DrScore.com has revealed that the amount of time a patient spends with his or her doctor is more likely to impact his or her satisfaction level than the amount of time spent waiting to see the doctor. Patients are willing to wait longer without becoming dissatisfied if they feel that the physician does not rush them through the appointment. A long wait time followed by a brief visit with the doctor is a “toxic combination” resulting in dramatically decreased patient satisfaction rates. I specialize in psoriasis management, and many times I can tell from the door of the office that a patient has psoriasis, and I could write the prescription for medication as I’m walking into the room. But if I did that, I would leave the patient feeling like I didn’t spend any time with him and didn’t care about him — and that patient probably wouldn’t trust my judgment and wouldn’t use the medications I prescribed or follow my treatment plan.
  • The benefits of continually improving your patient satisfaction scores are many – our data shows that satisfied patients are more likely to follow doctor’s orders resulting in better treatment outcomes.  This also leads to lower health care costs and improved productivity and profitability for your practice.

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Some of my colleagues — other doctors — were recently discussing what to do about a situation. They thought another doctor had provided what they considered sub-optimal care to a loved one.

It was interesting to listen to doctors discussing this topic — it’s something that non-doctors have been talking about for a long time.

My answer to the question, “What to do if you believe the doctor did not provide the best medical care?” Here’s a few suggestions:

  • Communicate with the doctor who took care of the patient.
  • Respectfully raise your concerns.
  • Find out the doctor’s story about what he or she did and what she or he was thinking.

Many times, our impression of the problem disappears when we hear the other person’s side of the story — and that isn’t just limited to the world of medicine. But ultimately, if there is a problem with the care, the doctor needs to know. Providing feedback is essential for doctors to improve.

That’s where doctor rating Web sites, such as DrScore.com come in.  If a doctor feels intimidated about contacting another doctor with an issue about the care provided a family member, imagine how much more intimidating it is for patients who are not working in the field of medicine.

I will always believe that giving patients a discreet, anonymous venue means to give doctors feedback — like we do with the http://www.DrScore.com Web site — helps to facilitate feedback and improve patient care in a completely non-threatening way.

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A recent  AMA News article pointed out that most doctors can’t yet access medical records through their smart phone.

Wow …  I remember using a slide rule, needing a dime and a pay phone to make a telephone call, and being amazed at the new technology that allowed me to make a call by pressing buttons instead of turning a dial. Technology is advancing so fast that  it seems we have come to take for granted that we should have instant access to all sorts of information — even medical records.

Today, a friend gave me a sheet of little happy face stickers.  I wanted to get more, so I looked up the catalog number printed on the sheet, found them on Google in about 26 seconds, and had ordered them within two  minutes.  Amazing.  I’m sure it won’t be long before I can look up a patient’s lab test results — better yet, a graph of their current and past lab test results — within seconds from anywhere in the world.

It’s exciting to be a part of technological advances.  At DrScore.com, we make information on doctors easily available and accessible — right at  your fingertips.  You can search for doctors in your area by specialty, get their contact information and even see how they’ve been rated.  And how much does all this cost?  It’s free.

Ah, the modern world.  It may not be perfect, but we should count our blessings.

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As the founder of one of America’s leading doctor rating Web sites, I’ve had many opportunities to talk to doctors about what they think of these sites.

As you might imagine, the opinions run from “what a horrible development this is” to “what a great idea.”

One thing I have  found is that no one seems to be bothered by a Web site that gives patients accurate information on doctors.  The doctors who don’t like the idea of these sites usually only express concern that the information may not be reliable.  They have a point.  Unless there are a lot of ratings, it is likely that the ratings could be skewed.

Because of that likelihood, some doctors come to the conclusion that these physician rating Web sites should be ignored or closed.  I take the opposite view.

The more people use these sites, the more representative the ratings will be.

If you’ve seen a doctor, fill out the brief DrScore survey at www.DrScore.com.  Help the public see a more representative sample of how doctors are doing.  If we can get that kind of sample, I don’t think doctors will have anything to be afraid of.

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