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Posts Tagged ‘rate doctor’

American Medical News reports that patients would pay their medical bills more quickly using the Internet (Dolan PL, Patients say they would pay more quickly with online access).  This isn’t surprising to us at DrScore.  Facility with the Internet is rapidly becoming ubiquitous.  Patients recognize the potential of the Internet to facilitate all kinds of transactions.

At DrScore, we’ve recognized for years that the Internet can also be used to facilitate getting feedback from patients.  By sending patients a link to DrScore with the bill, physicians can seek feedback from every patient, letting each patient know their opinions are respected, getting the kind of detailed feedback doctors need in order to know how well they are doing and what they can do even better.

Just as online access can ease billing issues, the hassles, costs and limitations of paper-based or telephone-based patient satisfaction surveys can now be avoided.

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DrScore crested 186,000 physician ratings today. Help us reach 200,000 fast. Rate your doctor at www.DrScore.com.

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A few key messages about online doctor ratings at DrScore.com.

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As we approach the end of the year, I always find it useful to make a list of reasons why we believe online physician rating is an important tool for health care practitioners (and, of course, why we think DrScore is the best!). Here are a few thoughts on why DrScore is a great tool for both consumers and doctors:

A Site for Consumers

  • All doctors need feedback from their patients. I created DrScore.com because I had learned from my own patient feedback that there is much more to great medical care than giving the right diagnosis andthe right treatment. Doctors care about their patients, but they have to make sure the patient knows that they care.
  • As physicians, we want to deliver the best care possible, and across the board, patients are telling us we’re doing a great job.  It’s a fact that often gets lost when the media only focus on the negative experiences that patients have.
  • When patients are satisfied with their physician interaction, they are more likely to follow doctors’ orders. Patient satisfaction leads to improved adherence to prescriptions, better outcomes and ultimately reduced health care costs.
  • DrScore.com is the only Web site where patients can rate their physician and know that their doctor, if he or she is a subscriber, is reviewing their feedback and  taking action. Patients complete an anonymous, validated, online interactive patient survey that are then distributed to their physicians on a monthly basis. These survey cover everything from accessible parking to waiting time and treatment access to time spent with the physician. In turn, physicians can view summaries of their ratings through the site or receive more detailed reports that allow them to “drill down” into the data to improve patient care.
  • Consumers can also use DrScore.com to find a doctor in their community. Doctors are categorized by specialty and community

A Site for Doctors

  • DrScore is a physician rating Web site that physicians send their patients to with the ultimate goal of enhancing the quality of patient care. The site is not a vehicle for selling advertising or a forum for bashing doctors. It’s about helping patients and doctors have the best medical care experience.
  • With DrScore, physicians don’t have to hire a research firm to conduct patient satisfaction research. Instead, they have year-round access to summaries of their ratings through the site and detailed reports that allow them to “drill down” into the data to improve patient care. The data is extremely detailed and actionable, and allows physicians to pinpoint exactly where improvements in patient care need to be made.
  • Doctors should be encouraging their patients to do online ratings in order to determine a truly representative score and find out where improvements need to be made. In today’s customer-service oriented world, positive feedback is equally important so doctors will know what they are doing right and continue to act upon it.
  • Data from DrScore.com has revealed that the amount of time a patient spends with his or her doctor is more likely to impact his or her satisfaction level than the amount of time spent waiting to see the doctor. Patients are willing to wait longer without becoming dissatisfied if they feel that the physician does not rush them through the appointment. A long wait time followed by a brief visit with the doctor is a “toxic combination” resulting in dramatically decreased patient satisfaction rates. I specialize in psoriasis management, and many times I can tell from the door of the office that a patient has psoriasis, and I could write the prescription for medication as I’m walking into the room. But if I did that, I would leave the patient feeling like I didn’t spend any time with him and didn’t care about him — and that patient probably wouldn’t trust my judgment and wouldn’t use the medications I prescribed or follow my treatment plan.
  • The benefits of continually improving your patient satisfaction scores are many – our data shows that satisfied patients are more likely to follow doctor’s orders resulting in better treatment outcomes.  This also leads to lower health care costs and improved productivity and profitability for your practice.

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Despite trying to stay healthy, I have a passion for fast food.  Just the other day, I ate out at both Panera Bread and Taco Bell.  I was struck that both companies asked me to complete a survey on my visit, with the request to visit online satisfaction survey sites printed automatically on the receipts.

These companies, like so many others, are collecting customer service feedback and probably act in some way on the results.  I imagine the parent corporations for these stores are committed to making sure there customers get a great experience—not just great food, but a great all around experience, too.

I may be biased, but I think medical care is more important than tacos.  I think attention to providing patient-centered medical services is more important than attention to providing good customer care with bagels and danish.

DrScore.com makes it just as easy and inexpensive for doctors to get patient feedback.  Just as Panera and Taco Bell print the request on the receipts, I look forward to the day when all patients get asked for feedback when they receive a bill or a return appointment card.

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I very much enjoy reading Dr. Kevin Pho’s articles.  Today I read his article, “Online doctor ratings aren’t very helpful” online in USA Today. He asks, “Can patients reliably choose a good doctor online?”

I guess one could ask a simpler question, “Can patients reliably choose a good doctor?”  I think the answer to that question is an unequivocal “yes!”  There are great doctors all across the United States.  Does online information help?  The answer again is “yes, certainly.”

State medical boards across the country give people information on doctors’ training and malpractice judgments. The American Board of Medical Specialties gives the public information on doctors’ board certification online, too, at abms.org. (To learn more about the ABMS, listen to ABMS president Dr. Kevin Weiss on the Getting Better Health Care radio program.

Then, there is the question of online doctor rating sites.  Online rating could be a powerful tool, and Dr. Pho makes a great point that doctors should encourage their patients to do online ratings.  Over 1,000 doctors are already encouraging their patients to do online ratings at www.DrScore.com, and, as Dr. Pho rightly notes, the average doctor with 20 or more ratings has a rating of over 9 out of 10.  That’s right, the average doctor—average—is a 9.3 out of 10.  Even “below average doctors” are still very, very good doctors when it comes to patient satisfaction.

Working in medicine, that doesn’t surprise me, because every day I see doctors with an extraordinary commitment to training, to skills and to giving patients great medical care.

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Some of my colleagues — other doctors — were recently discussing what to do about a situation. They thought another doctor had provided what they considered sub-optimal care to a loved one.

It was interesting to listen to doctors discussing this topic — it’s something that non-doctors have been talking about for a long time.

My answer to the question, “What to do if you believe the doctor did not provide the best medical care?” Here’s a few suggestions:

  • Communicate with the doctor who took care of the patient.
  • Respectfully raise your concerns.
  • Find out the doctor’s story about what he or she did and what she or he was thinking.

Many times, our impression of the problem disappears when we hear the other person’s side of the story — and that isn’t just limited to the world of medicine. But ultimately, if there is a problem with the care, the doctor needs to know. Providing feedback is essential for doctors to improve.

That’s where doctor rating Web sites, such as DrScore.com come in.  If a doctor feels intimidated about contacting another doctor with an issue about the care provided a family member, imagine how much more intimidating it is for patients who are not working in the field of medicine.

I will always believe that giving patients a discreet, anonymous venue means to give doctors feedback — like we do with the http://www.DrScore.com Web site — helps to facilitate feedback and improve patient care in a completely non-threatening way.

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