Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘physician rating’

American Medical News reports that patients would pay their medical bills more quickly using the Internet (Dolan PL, Patients say they would pay more quickly with online access).  This isn’t surprising to us at DrScore.  Facility with the Internet is rapidly becoming ubiquitous.  Patients recognize the potential of the Internet to facilitate all kinds of transactions.

At DrScore, we’ve recognized for years that the Internet can also be used to facilitate getting feedback from patients.  By sending patients a link to DrScore with the bill, physicians can seek feedback from every patient, letting each patient know their opinions are respected, getting the kind of detailed feedback doctors need in order to know how well they are doing and what they can do even better.

Just as online access can ease billing issues, the hassles, costs and limitations of paper-based or telephone-based patient satisfaction surveys can now be avoided.

Read Full Post »

Doctor’s Day is March 30. Here’s our latest press release for DrScore.com in recognition of the important role that doctors play in patients’ lives.

 

Patient Satisfaction: DrScore’s Three Simple Solutions for Improving Customer Service

Online physician rating website shares latest research for Doctor’s Day on March 30

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–In recognition of Doctor’s Day on March 30 and the important role that physicians play in patients’ lives, DrScore.com is sharing three simple solutions to improving patient satisfaction. The tips are the result of an analysis of data from 180,000 patient satisfaction surveys on the DrScore.com online doctor rating website.

“It’s a fact: A patient’s health care experience does matter. Patient satisfaction is important in its own right, but it also improves the outcomes of a patient’s care,” said patient satisfaction expert Steve Feldman, M.D., founder of DrScore. “And at DrScore, the online ratings of patient experiences strongly suggest that there are three very important factors that contribute to patient satisfaction.”

1. Keep wait times short. DrScore’s data analysis found that 44 percent of wait times were less than 15 minutes, 34 percent were 15 to 30 minutes, 13 percent were 30 to 60 minutes, and 9 percent were greater than one hour. “There is a strong, statistically significant correlation between wait times and overall patient satisfaction,” Dr. Feldman said. He suggested the following to improve patient satisfaction in this area:

  • If wait times are consistently running longer than 30 minutes, doctors should look into their operations and find out if patients are being scheduled too close together or if there is another operational reason this is happening. “Making the goal 15 minutes or less is even better, particularly for primary care providers,” Dr. Feldman said.
  • Make the waiting room pleasant with plenty of good reading materials, coffee, etc. “Time goes by very slowly in an unpleasant waiting room,” Dr. Feldman said. “The best doctors don’t even call it a waiting room — they call it a reception area and do their best not to keep patients waiting.”

2. Spend enough time with each patient. “Patients tend to feel like 10 minutes or longer is adequate time to spend with the doctor, and the DrScore data shows that two-thirds of visits last this amount of time,” Dr. Feldman said. “We found that 23 percent of visits run five to 10 minutes, and 11 percent run less than five minutes. The statistics are clear: The longer a doctor spends with a patient, the more satisfied the patient tends to be with the visit.”

3. Make sure your demeanor is perceived as being friendly and caring. Patients need to have a sense of feeling cared for. “A caring and friendly attitude is far and away the most important variable that contributes to patient satisfaction,” Dr. Feldman said.

The DrScore researchers performed an analysis to determine the independent contributions of different variables such as age, gender, first or return visit, routine or emergent care, wait time, time with doctor and the doctor’s friendly/caring attitude. Wait time and time with doctor were statistically significant, but their contribution to overall satisfaction was small, each accounting for only about 10 percent of the variance in patient satisfaction. In contrast, the doctor’s friendly/caring attitude was the strongest contributor to patient satisfaction, accounting for more than three-fourths of the variance in patient satisfaction/doctor rating scores.

“Tips 1 and 2 don’t matter nearly as much as Tip 3,” Dr. Feldman said. “Every time, before a doctor walks into the exam room, he or she should pause and think: ‘How am I going to make this patient feel cared for today?’ And ‘how can I make sure they realize I am a friendly, caring doctor?”

About DrScore.com

Founded by Steve Feldman, M.D., DrScore.com is an interactive online survey site where patients can rate their physicians, as well as find a physician based on their service level preference. DrScore’s mission is to improve medical care by giving patients a forum for rating their physicians, and by giving doctors an affordable, objective, non-intrusive means of documenting the quality of care that they provide. For more information, visit www.drscore.com.

Read Full Post »

One of the benefits of online doctor rating — a benefit to patients and doctors — is a transparency of medical care quality that will help people identify the bad doctors, the uncaring ones, the ones who, according to some patients, you wouldn’t send your dog to. Patients aren’t the only ones who know about these doctors.  Doctors know about them too. They have seen patients who were seen by these colleagues, and all of those patients were unhappy with the care they received.

I know that online doctor rating isn’t going to find many such doctors.  In fact, quite the opposite, online rating of physicians is going to show there aren’t nearly so many “bad doctors” out there as people think there are. Let me explain.

I’m a practicing dermatologist.  I see patients who have seen another dermatologist in town, maybe a dozen or so of that doctor’s patients.  Every one of those patients was unhappy with the care they received, and none of those patients received treatment that cured their condition.

Now that’s clear evidence the other dermatologist didn’t know what they were doing, right?

No, not right.  You see, every time that other dermatologist clears up his or her patient’s rash and gives his or her patient a medical care experience the patient is happy with, that patient continues seeing the other dermatologist and doesn’t come see me.  I  see that doctor’s outliers, the occasional patient who, for whatever reason, didn’t get better or who was unhappy.  I’m sure that the other dermatologist sees a few of my former patients too, only the ones whom I didn’t cure, only the ones who were unhappy with me.  Our observations give us a misleading picture of other people.

Well what about those doctors whose patients post comments like, “I wouldn’t send my dog to that doctor?”  That kind of comment does happen, and, sadly, I’m sure that’s the true opinion of the patient who makes that comment.  But those comments are generally not anywhere close to representative of what the vast majority of that doctor’s patients think.  I get comments like that at times (thankfully less often than I used to, having learned from patient satisfaction feedback what I was doing wrong).  I’ve been rated over 500 times on DrScore.com.  The average of those scores is 9.1 out of 10 (not bad, according to my mom).  Still, occasional patients give me a 0 or a 1 for their experience.  I know they may think everyone gives me a 0 or 1, that I’m a “bad doctor,” but the great majority of my patients think I’m a 9 or 10.  So far, that’s true for all the doctors with just 10 or more ratings on DrScore.

There may be “bad doctors” out there, but I suspect they are incredibly rare.  There weren’t any in my medical school class, and I have yet to meet one in person.  If there are any, I hope we do smoke them out with online ratings.  If they exist, maybe the online scrutiny will wake them up to the need to improve the quality of care they offer.

Read Full Post »

t’s great to see that people are accessing DrScore research and hopefully putting it to use to make sure patients get the best possible medical care.

Dear Dr Feldman:

Re: Your paper published in Patient Related Outcome Measures

I wanted to let you know that your paper, “Patient satisfaction with obstetricians and gynecologists compared with other specialties: analysis of US self-reported survey data”, has been well received since it went online.

Total views: 576

URL: http://www.dovepress.com/articles.php?article_id=6063&l=ItAn0uejcIr9quaxAks7RURS20272

Weeks Since Published: 4

Best regards

Ms. Olliver
Dove Medical Press
2G, 5 Ceres Court, Mairangi Bay, Auckland, New Zealand.
PO Box 300-008, Albany, Auckland, New Zealand.

www.dovepress.com – open access to scientific and medical research

[15747]


Read Full Post »

A very nice blog post described the difficulty in getting some doctors to recognize the importance of measuring patients’ satisfaction.  The blog post differentiated patient satisfaction from “clinical quality.”

While the blog post was right on the mark in many ways, differentiating patient satisfaction from quality of care may be a mistake.  Patient satisfaction is a critical dimension of the quality of medical care.  Sure, making the right diagnosis and prescribing the right treatment are essential elements of good medical care, but patient satisfaction is an essential element as well.  To achieve great medical care, patients must feel cared for.  The way to find out if that’s being achieved is to ask them.

Read Full Post »

DrScore has shown time and again that doctors’ conventional wisdom about doctor rating — that only unhappy patients will rate their doctors online — is completely wrong.  The most common overall satisfaction score that patients give their doctors is a perfect 10.  The next most common score is 9.  Of doctors with 10 or more ratings, the average score is just over 9.3 out of 10.  And if a doctor wants to make the annual “America’s Most Loved Health Care Providers” in the United States, he or she will have to have a score well over 9.9 out of 10.

So. if so many people are so thoroughly happy with their doctors, why do we need online doctor rating at all?
First, the public wants to know (and doctors need the public to know) how well doctors are doing.  The newspaper is never going to publish a front page news story with a title like, “John Smith Sees Dr. Jones and Has a Wonderful Office Visit.”  No, if the newspaper publishes a front-page story about a doctor, It is most likely negative, leading people’s perceptions about quality of care to get quite warped.

Transparency is good for medicine.
Second, getting feedback from patients online is easy, efficient and helps doctors do what doctors want to do most: give patients great care. DrScore’s interactive survey makes it possible for doctors to get the detailed feedback they need — both positive and negative criticism —t o make their medical practice better from patients’ perspectives.

In all honesty, I don’t think Nordstrom’s or Disney would be happy with a score of just 9 out of 10, with one in 10 or one in 20 customers being distressed with their experience.  We in medicine can — and should — be aiming higher, trying to give all patients what they consider a perfect, caring medical experience.

Read Full Post »

Suppose there was a story in the newspaper with a headline like this:

Pope calls for an end of Internet posting about rogue priests

And let’s suppose the article went on to say something like:

After meeting with the Council of Cardinals, the Pope called for ending Internet postings about rogue priests.  The Pontiff’s spokesman said that the Pope and the Cardinals agreed, after seeing a profusion of websites rating priests and posting comments about problems in the Church, that such posting was not only defamatory to priests and the Church but also unfair because priests were not permitted to respond to the postings or even to acknowledge that the poster was a parishioner.  The Pontiff’s spokesman decried the fact that only unhappy Catholics were posting material about their priests, giving people a very biased perception.  As a solution, an American Cardinal has suggested that the Church might try having church-going parishioners sign a contract in which the parishioner would agree not to post online any material about the priest or their church service.

Of course, this is just an exercise of the imagination.  But it is an interesting  to consider, particularly because many doctors have espoused contracts with patients as an answer to the “problem” of Internet rating of doctors.

The Internet is a tool, a powerful tool, which massively expands people’s ability to communicate, transmit and spread information and disinformation.  Doctors are rightly concerned about their reputations and the potential for Internet posts by patients (or by people claiming to be patients) to wrongfully accuse doctors of malfeasance, incompetence or greed.  But the genie is out of the bottle.
Doctors need not give up hope, however.  The Internet is an equally powerful tool to let the public know about the real quality of care that doctors are giving patients on a day-to-day basis.  By encouraging patients to rate their doctors online, doctors can give the public a much more representative view of what American medicine is like.  Doctors devote their lives to the quality of care they provide patients.  There’s no reason to hide. In fact, proposals to limit the public’s ability to communicate their experiences with their physicians are counterproductive, only making it look like doctors have something to hide.  Embracing online rating will help increase public awareness of the dedication of physicians to their patients.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: