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Posts Tagged ‘pharmacy’

Joe and Terry Graedon interviewed me about my book Compartments on the People’s Pharmacy: Compartments and Communication.

Our interview was about how misperceptions can lead to communication difficulties that interfere with good health care. When people are operating within their own area of expertise, they may find it hard to understand what the big picture looks like from another person’s perspective. Whether the differences lie between doctor and patient or between different health care providers, the results can be unfair judgments and missed opportunities.

This  attitude can affect the way doctors interpret the results of placebo-controlled trials and how they feel about home remedies. We also discussed the pros and cons of e-mail communication between doctors and patients, and how to choose a good doctor.

Listen here and let me know what you think.

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Clinical trials bring us the new wonder drugs that would have been considered either magical or miraculous in earlier times. Are you interested in how drugs are tested to assure efficacy and safety?

On two episodes of Getting Better Health Care, clinical researcher Bea Abrams, PhD, with over 30 years experience in pharmaceutical development, explains the process of clinical trials done to bring a new drug to market.  She shares with us critical information that lets us know how much we can trust new drugs and what to look out for.

In a subsequent episode, I’ll be talking with Dr. Lawrence Friedhoff — author of the book, New Drugs: An Insider’s Guide to the FDA’s New Drug Approval Process for Scientists, Investors and Patients — about myths that surround new drug development.

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My gerontologist has me taking generic Zocor daily to help control my cholesterol. Having obsessive-compulsive tendencies, I’m very good at taking the drug regularly. I have a seven-day pillbox that helps me remember to take the medicine as directed. But even I’m not perfect.  

A few days before my prescription ran out, I called the pharmacy for a refill. The prescription had become outdated, so the pharmacy had to contact my physician’s office for the refill. No problem. I had contacted the pharmacy several days before my pill bottle would be empty. I had four days to get the medication. 

Everything went perfectly well. The pharmacist contacted the doctor, the doctor refilled the medication, and the pharmacist prepared the prescription. Then I forgot to pick it up. I missed about three days before I realized my error.  

OK, so I missed three days. Fortunately, this isn’t the kind of medication for which missing doses can mean life or death (like HIV drug treatments or immunosuppressive drugs in someone who had an organ transplant). I rarely miss doses, realizing that if I want the drug to work, I probably need to take it.  

If a patient isn’t taking the drug exactly as directed, it isn’t the end of the world. Just be honest with your doctor about it. It’s hard enough to make a treatment plan when the doctor knows what the patient is doing. It’s that much harder when the doctor doesn’t know. 

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