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Posts Tagged ‘doctor reviews’

 

When we look at doctors who have a lot of ratings, it isn’t unusual to see lots of high ratings and an occasional low rating.  The average score of these doctors is very high.  But if you took a whole lot of doctors like that and they only had one rating each, the average would still be the same, but there would be a lot of doctors with one 10 and a few with one zero.  The score of those doctors who have just one low rating obviously isn’t representative of their practice.  What could be done about this?  Well the answer suggested by some people is not to show ratings when there are few or to get rid of doctor ratings online altogether.  We think that people are smart enough to interpret the scores if they are told how many ratings there are.  When doctors have just one low score, rather than throwing it out or hiding it, we encourage them to ask a few patients to put ratings in.  That way, a more representative score is there for people to see.  Moreover, we should always keep in mind that the detailed feedback that comes with a low score can be a gift to the doctor, giving the doctor valuable feedback on the concerns of one of their very few unhappy patients, hopefully the kind of feedback that will help the doctor not have unhappy patients in the future.

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Doctor’s Day is March 30. Here’s our latest press release for DrScore.com in recognition of the important role that doctors play in patients’ lives.

 

Patient Satisfaction: DrScore’s Three Simple Solutions for Improving Customer Service

Online physician rating website shares latest research for Doctor’s Day on March 30

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–In recognition of Doctor’s Day on March 30 and the important role that physicians play in patients’ lives, DrScore.com is sharing three simple solutions to improving patient satisfaction. The tips are the result of an analysis of data from 180,000 patient satisfaction surveys on the DrScore.com online doctor rating website.

“It’s a fact: A patient’s health care experience does matter. Patient satisfaction is important in its own right, but it also improves the outcomes of a patient’s care,” said patient satisfaction expert Steve Feldman, M.D., founder of DrScore. “And at DrScore, the online ratings of patient experiences strongly suggest that there are three very important factors that contribute to patient satisfaction.”

1. Keep wait times short. DrScore’s data analysis found that 44 percent of wait times were less than 15 minutes, 34 percent were 15 to 30 minutes, 13 percent were 30 to 60 minutes, and 9 percent were greater than one hour. “There is a strong, statistically significant correlation between wait times and overall patient satisfaction,” Dr. Feldman said. He suggested the following to improve patient satisfaction in this area:

  • If wait times are consistently running longer than 30 minutes, doctors should look into their operations and find out if patients are being scheduled too close together or if there is another operational reason this is happening. “Making the goal 15 minutes or less is even better, particularly for primary care providers,” Dr. Feldman said.
  • Make the waiting room pleasant with plenty of good reading materials, coffee, etc. “Time goes by very slowly in an unpleasant waiting room,” Dr. Feldman said. “The best doctors don’t even call it a waiting room — they call it a reception area and do their best not to keep patients waiting.”

2. Spend enough time with each patient. “Patients tend to feel like 10 minutes or longer is adequate time to spend with the doctor, and the DrScore data shows that two-thirds of visits last this amount of time,” Dr. Feldman said. “We found that 23 percent of visits run five to 10 minutes, and 11 percent run less than five minutes. The statistics are clear: The longer a doctor spends with a patient, the more satisfied the patient tends to be with the visit.”

3. Make sure your demeanor is perceived as being friendly and caring. Patients need to have a sense of feeling cared for. “A caring and friendly attitude is far and away the most important variable that contributes to patient satisfaction,” Dr. Feldman said.

The DrScore researchers performed an analysis to determine the independent contributions of different variables such as age, gender, first or return visit, routine or emergent care, wait time, time with doctor and the doctor’s friendly/caring attitude. Wait time and time with doctor were statistically significant, but their contribution to overall satisfaction was small, each accounting for only about 10 percent of the variance in patient satisfaction. In contrast, the doctor’s friendly/caring attitude was the strongest contributor to patient satisfaction, accounting for more than three-fourths of the variance in patient satisfaction/doctor rating scores.

“Tips 1 and 2 don’t matter nearly as much as Tip 3,” Dr. Feldman said. “Every time, before a doctor walks into the exam room, he or she should pause and think: ‘How am I going to make this patient feel cared for today?’ And ‘how can I make sure they realize I am a friendly, caring doctor?”

About DrScore.com

Founded by Steve Feldman, M.D., DrScore.com is an interactive online survey site where patients can rate their physicians, as well as find a physician based on their service level preference. DrScore’s mission is to improve medical care by giving patients a forum for rating their physicians, and by giving doctors an affordable, objective, non-intrusive means of documenting the quality of care that they provide. For more information, visit www.drscore.com.

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Some doctors are totally disgusted with the profusion of online doctor rating websites.  I understand why they feel that way.  As great a career as medicine is, it seems horrible to have to worry about online doctor ratings on top of the years of training, the continuing commitment to ongoing medical education, the trials and tribulations of running an office, and the stresses of caring for sick patients.
Are online doctor rating websites like DrScore.com the bows for patients’ arrows at doctors?  That’s not the way I think of it. DrScore is more of a vase to display to the flowers that patients give the doctors that they appreciate.  The vast, vast majority of patients love their doctors, and online rating is way to make those patients visible.  When doctors see the esteem they are held in by patients, I think it will help doctors renew their commitment to giving patients great medical care.

Doctor’s Day is coming March 30. Give your doctors some flowers for their vase by rating them online at DrScore.com.

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A very nice blog post described the difficulty in getting some doctors to recognize the importance of measuring patients’ satisfaction.  The blog post differentiated patient satisfaction from “clinical quality.”

While the blog post was right on the mark in many ways, differentiating patient satisfaction from quality of care may be a mistake.  Patient satisfaction is a critical dimension of the quality of medical care.  Sure, making the right diagnosis and prescribing the right treatment are essential elements of good medical care, but patient satisfaction is an essential element as well.  To achieve great medical care, patients must feel cared for.  The way to find out if that’s being achieved is to ask them.

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Suppose there was a story in the newspaper with a headline like this:

Pope calls for an end of Internet posting about rogue priests

And let’s suppose the article went on to say something like:

After meeting with the Council of Cardinals, the Pope called for ending Internet postings about rogue priests.  The Pontiff’s spokesman said that the Pope and the Cardinals agreed, after seeing a profusion of websites rating priests and posting comments about problems in the Church, that such posting was not only defamatory to priests and the Church but also unfair because priests were not permitted to respond to the postings or even to acknowledge that the poster was a parishioner.  The Pontiff’s spokesman decried the fact that only unhappy Catholics were posting material about their priests, giving people a very biased perception.  As a solution, an American Cardinal has suggested that the Church might try having church-going parishioners sign a contract in which the parishioner would agree not to post online any material about the priest or their church service.

Of course, this is just an exercise of the imagination.  But it is an interesting  to consider, particularly because many doctors have espoused contracts with patients as an answer to the “problem” of Internet rating of doctors.

The Internet is a tool, a powerful tool, which massively expands people’s ability to communicate, transmit and spread information and disinformation.  Doctors are rightly concerned about their reputations and the potential for Internet posts by patients (or by people claiming to be patients) to wrongfully accuse doctors of malfeasance, incompetence or greed.  But the genie is out of the bottle.
Doctors need not give up hope, however.  The Internet is an equally powerful tool to let the public know about the real quality of care that doctors are giving patients on a day-to-day basis.  By encouraging patients to rate their doctors online, doctors can give the public a much more representative view of what American medicine is like.  Doctors devote their lives to the quality of care they provide patients.  There’s no reason to hide. In fact, proposals to limit the public’s ability to communicate their experiences with their physicians are counterproductive, only making it look like doctors have something to hide.  Embracing online rating will help increase public awareness of the dedication of physicians to their patients.

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February — the month of Valentine’s Day and love. In the next week, we will be releasing who is America’s Most Loved Doctor, a doctor who had a significant number of ratings, along with the highest average rating, during 2010.

Last year’s America’s Most Loved Doctor was Thomas Selznick, DO, a family practitioner in Livonia, Michigan, with Livonia Family Physicians. His overall score was a 9.96 out of 10, and patient after patient described how ‘caring’ he was, how he takes time with the patient, listens and doesn’t hurry.

Who will be this year’s most loved doctor? I’ll give you a hint — it’s a doctor from the south this year, and it’s not a family practitioner.

Do you have a favorite doctor that you would like to see as America’s Most Loved Doctor for 2011? The way to do it is to provide feedback about your doctor through a DrScore.com survey. Rate your doctor and encourage other patients to rate him or her, too!

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Are obstetricians and gynecologists more friendly and caring than other specialists?.

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