Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘doctor ratings’

In a January 21, 2013, issue of Forbes magazine, entitled “Why Rating Your Doctor Is Bad For Your Health,”  Kai Falkenberg described a downside to doctor rating, doctors giving patients care that the patient wanted but that the doctor didn’t think was needed, or worse, that was even harmful.  The article suggested that doctor rating may at times drive doctors to lean to heavily toward patients’ and their families desires, even when it wasn’t in the patient’s best interest.

It’s an interesting issue.  First, this article point out the power of doctor ratings to change doctors’ behaviors.  Presumably, there’s an upside to this, encouraging those doctors who are not fully meeting their patients’ needs to more fully address patients’ concerns from patients’ perspectives. For the most part, one would think that’s a good thing. 

Is it possible that doctor rating goes too far?   It is certainly true that more testing, more drugs, & more hospitalization are not always in patients’ best interests, and it may be — frequent or not — that some patients want and expect more treatment than they really need, more than would be beneficial, even so much that it would be harmful. 

Who should choose?  Is it better to have a system where the doctor takes responsibility for the final decision without pressure for not following patients’ wishes?  Would a system where patients decide — supported by a doctor who educates and provides counsel — be more appropriate?  The answers to these questions may come down to perspective, perspective shaped by concerns for patients’ autonomy, for their protection (even from themselves), and the costs of health care decisions and who is paying for those costs. 

Ratings can give doctors important feedback on how they are serving their patients’ needs (as seen from the patient’s perspective).  Overall, doctors have strong patient satisfaction ratings (on average, well over 9 on a 0-10 scale on www.DrScore.com), and a caring doctor who educates patients and gives them wise counsel is sure to have exceptionally good overall ratings.  What should a doctor do when a patient demands something that the doctor cannot ethically provide?  Should fear of a bad rating cause a doctor to mistreat a patient?  Obviously not!  In the instances where this is an issue, doctors should suck it up, stand tall and provide the best possible medical care, not worrying about one low rating among so, so many high ones.  The solution isn’t to give up doctor ratings but to encourage them, so that a fuller and more representative picture is publicly transparent.  The Internet has made this a part of the future of our health care system.

Read Full Post »

It is hard to put terrible tragedies in perspective.  While the magnitude isn’t the same, this principle applies to doctor rating, too.  There are 2 to 3 million office visits to physicians in the United States every day, some 800 million per year.  How many make the cover of the newspapers?  Fortunately, no more than a handful make the newspaper cover, but each one in that handful represents some tragedy that may leave people feeling there is something “sick” in our medical care system.  Perhaps it is a pediatrician who abused children.  Or a hospital that killed a patient by giving the wrong blood.  Those horrific events are tragedies, but they aren’t representative of the millions of office visits that occur each day which don’t make the news, visits that are invisible because everything went fine, normal visits that weren’t newsworthy.

Doctor ratings websites like DrScore give the public a means to begin to see those invisible visits, to realize that the great majority of patients are happy with their doctors.

Read Full Post »

DrScore crested 186,000 physician ratings today. Help us reach 200,000 fast. Rate your doctor at www.DrScore.com.

Read Full Post »

A simple solution — greater transparency for all.

Read Full Post »

An e-mail arrived from a marketer offering to help market my medical practice.  The message talked about how the Internet can be good or bad, how doctor rating websites can negatively affect a practice, and how this marketer has solutions for how to put the Internet to better use.

I have a solution, and it’s really quite simple.  Doctors should be encouraging their patients to do online ratings.  Doctors are doing a great job for their patients.  What doctors need is transparency: We ought to encourage patients to do online ratings so that the public sees the great quality of care that doctors are providing.

On the DrScore.com rating site, the average score of a doctor with 20 or more ratings is 9.3 out of 10!  There’s no reason to want to hide that.

Read Full Post »

Here’s DrScore’s latest press release on why physicians and patients should be thankful for online doctor ratings:

Three Reasons Physicians (and Patients) Can Be Thankful for
Online Doctor Ratings

DrScore:Online rating is here to stay … a few reasons why you can accept it with grace.’

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. (Nov. 16, 2010) – Online doctor ratings continue to generate controversy among physicians, and in the news and blogosphere. But proponents and opponents do agree on one thing: The ability to rate your doctor online is here to stay. Thus, the month of Thanksgiving is a great time to highlight three reasons why doctors and patients should be thankful for this method of providing feedback.

“Rating your doctor or searching for a doctor online is the 2010 version of asking your neighbor for or providing your neighbor with a recommendation — they expand our ability to find out about other people’s experiences,” says patient satisfaction expert Steve Feldman, M.D, the founder of DrScore.com. “Online rating is here to stay — here’s a few reasons why you can accept it with grace.”

No. 1: Every aspect of the clinical encounter is important for patients and physicians.

Yes, the technical medical process — whether the doctor is making the right diagnosis and prescribing the right treatment — is critical to the medical experience. But if the patient sees a shabby office, has a long wait, or feels like the physician is uncaring and dismissive, it can affect the patient’s experience and how well he or she responds to the prescribed treatment.

“I receive quarterly reports that provide constructive feedback on every aspect of the clinical encounter — from parking access to nursing to the actual visit. This allows me to concentrate on areas in which I may need to improve upon,” says Andrew D. Lee, M.D., a dermatologist in private practice in Elkin, N.C. “Early in my career, I received a report in which several patients commented that I did not allow them to participate in developing their treatment plans. Because of this, I immediately began involving my patients in choosing topical vehicles and discussing the benefits and risks of oral medications I prescribed.”

No. 2: Online ratings provide more medical transparency.

Patient access to meaningful information about health care quality is important to highlight both the positive and the negative aspects of health care, according to Dr. Feldman. “Doctors have nothing to fear and much to gain from transparency. It allows patients to see the strong work of physicians and helps physicians do what they want to do most, which is making the medical experience even better.”

Much of the controversy surrounds what should be considered “meaningful information.” For example, one-sided derogatory comments by patients who may have had a negative medical experience are not as meaningful as scientifically validated data that is collected and analyzed. “Constructive feedback is useful, but comments that are hurtful can do more harm than good, especially if they are taken out of context or are one-sided,” says Dr. Lee. “I believe one of DrScore’s strengths is that people who search for a physician on this site only have access to the doctor’s averaged scores, which they may use to objectively compare with other rated physicians.”

Still, doctors may be hesitant to ask patients to rate them online because they are concerned that an isolated criticism from an anonymous source will skew the score. Dr. Feldman feels strongly that the importance of allowing patients to remain anonymous outweighs any negatives. “Anonymity allows patients a greater degree of freedom to say what they really think,” he says. “If patients had to identify themselves, some of those who had something negative to say might feel stifled or intimidated. But it’s important to note that when a doctor has just a few ratings — particularly if they only have one rating — the overall rating may not be truly representative.”

That is why it is important for doctors to ask all their patients to contribute feedback online — and for all patients to consider rating their doctors, according to Dr. Lee.  “The more feedback you receive, the more valuable that feedback is, and the more truly representative a doctor’s score is. This is a benefit to both doctors and patients.”

No. 3: Obtaining and utilizing patient feedback effectively will help control costs and improve health care.

Patient satisfaction has an impact on overall health care costs, according to Dr. Feldman. “Patients who are more satisfied with their doctors are more likely to go in for care or see their doctors at their office before they get sicker and have to be treated in a more expensive setting, such as the emergency room,” he says. “In addition, they are more likely to take their prescribed medications and follow other physician recommendations.”

Online doctor rating provides physicians with a valuable means of assessing the quality of the services they provide. In addition, they provide patients with the ability to be active participants in their health care experience by voicing their opinions and choosing their physicians on the basis of more objective criteria than traditional advertising and word-of-mouth.

“Patients deserve to be treated by physicians who provide excellent medical care in a compassionate and respectful manner,” Dr. Lee says. “The doctor rating websites that provide fair and balanced feedback are important in ensuring continuous quality improvement in our clinical practices.”

Read Full Post »

I very much enjoy reading Dr. Kevin Pho’s articles.  Today I read his article, “Online doctor ratings aren’t very helpful” online in USA Today. He asks, “Can patients reliably choose a good doctor online?”

I guess one could ask a simpler question, “Can patients reliably choose a good doctor?”  I think the answer to that question is an unequivocal “yes!”  There are great doctors all across the United States.  Does online information help?  The answer again is “yes, certainly.”

State medical boards across the country give people information on doctors’ training and malpractice judgments. The American Board of Medical Specialties gives the public information on doctors’ board certification online, too, at abms.org. (To learn more about the ABMS, listen to ABMS president Dr. Kevin Weiss on the Getting Better Health Care radio program.

Then, there is the question of online doctor rating sites.  Online rating could be a powerful tool, and Dr. Pho makes a great point that doctors should encourage their patients to do online ratings.  Over 1,000 doctors are already encouraging their patients to do online ratings at www.DrScore.com, and, as Dr. Pho rightly notes, the average doctor with 20 or more ratings has a rating of over 9 out of 10.  That’s right, the average doctor—average—is a 9.3 out of 10.  Even “below average doctors” are still very, very good doctors when it comes to patient satisfaction.

Working in medicine, that doesn’t surprise me, because every day I see doctors with an extraordinary commitment to training, to skills and to giving patients great medical care.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: