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Archive for the ‘transparency’ Category

American Medical News reports that patients would pay their medical bills more quickly using the Internet (Dolan PL, Patients say they would pay more quickly with online access).  This isn’t surprising to us at DrScore.  Facility with the Internet is rapidly becoming ubiquitous.  Patients recognize the potential of the Internet to facilitate all kinds of transactions.

At DrScore, we’ve recognized for years that the Internet can also be used to facilitate getting feedback from patients.  By sending patients a link to DrScore with the bill, physicians can seek feedback from every patient, letting each patient know their opinions are respected, getting the kind of detailed feedback doctors need in order to know how well they are doing and what they can do even better.

Just as online access can ease billing issues, the hassles, costs and limitations of paper-based or telephone-based patient satisfaction surveys can now be avoided.

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What’s right and what’s wrong with the U.S. health care system? Does it need a major overhaul or a few tweaks?

In a two part episode, I discuss the cost of the U.S. health care system with Dr. Robert Berenson, a health care policy expert who has served as a practicing physician, the manager of a large health plan and in senior government positions, including being in charge of Medicare payment policy and private health plan contracting in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

Dr. Berenson describes how incentives need to change to get control of our medical costs.  You can hear both of these episodes and others on my online podcast radio program, Getting Better Health Care.

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Doctor’s Day is March 30. Here’s our latest press release for DrScore.com in recognition of the important role that doctors play in patients’ lives.

 

Patient Satisfaction: DrScore’s Three Simple Solutions for Improving Customer Service

Online physician rating website shares latest research for Doctor’s Day on March 30

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–In recognition of Doctor’s Day on March 30 and the important role that physicians play in patients’ lives, DrScore.com is sharing three simple solutions to improving patient satisfaction. The tips are the result of an analysis of data from 180,000 patient satisfaction surveys on the DrScore.com online doctor rating website.

“It’s a fact: A patient’s health care experience does matter. Patient satisfaction is important in its own right, but it also improves the outcomes of a patient’s care,” said patient satisfaction expert Steve Feldman, M.D., founder of DrScore. “And at DrScore, the online ratings of patient experiences strongly suggest that there are three very important factors that contribute to patient satisfaction.”

1. Keep wait times short. DrScore’s data analysis found that 44 percent of wait times were less than 15 minutes, 34 percent were 15 to 30 minutes, 13 percent were 30 to 60 minutes, and 9 percent were greater than one hour. “There is a strong, statistically significant correlation between wait times and overall patient satisfaction,” Dr. Feldman said. He suggested the following to improve patient satisfaction in this area:

  • If wait times are consistently running longer than 30 minutes, doctors should look into their operations and find out if patients are being scheduled too close together or if there is another operational reason this is happening. “Making the goal 15 minutes or less is even better, particularly for primary care providers,” Dr. Feldman said.
  • Make the waiting room pleasant with plenty of good reading materials, coffee, etc. “Time goes by very slowly in an unpleasant waiting room,” Dr. Feldman said. “The best doctors don’t even call it a waiting room — they call it a reception area and do their best not to keep patients waiting.”

2. Spend enough time with each patient. “Patients tend to feel like 10 minutes or longer is adequate time to spend with the doctor, and the DrScore data shows that two-thirds of visits last this amount of time,” Dr. Feldman said. “We found that 23 percent of visits run five to 10 minutes, and 11 percent run less than five minutes. The statistics are clear: The longer a doctor spends with a patient, the more satisfied the patient tends to be with the visit.”

3. Make sure your demeanor is perceived as being friendly and caring. Patients need to have a sense of feeling cared for. “A caring and friendly attitude is far and away the most important variable that contributes to patient satisfaction,” Dr. Feldman said.

The DrScore researchers performed an analysis to determine the independent contributions of different variables such as age, gender, first or return visit, routine or emergent care, wait time, time with doctor and the doctor’s friendly/caring attitude. Wait time and time with doctor were statistically significant, but their contribution to overall satisfaction was small, each accounting for only about 10 percent of the variance in patient satisfaction. In contrast, the doctor’s friendly/caring attitude was the strongest contributor to patient satisfaction, accounting for more than three-fourths of the variance in patient satisfaction/doctor rating scores.

“Tips 1 and 2 don’t matter nearly as much as Tip 3,” Dr. Feldman said. “Every time, before a doctor walks into the exam room, he or she should pause and think: ‘How am I going to make this patient feel cared for today?’ And ‘how can I make sure they realize I am a friendly, caring doctor?”

About DrScore.com

Founded by Steve Feldman, M.D., DrScore.com is an interactive online survey site where patients can rate their physicians, as well as find a physician based on their service level preference. DrScore’s mission is to improve medical care by giving patients a forum for rating their physicians, and by giving doctors an affordable, objective, non-intrusive means of documenting the quality of care that they provide. For more information, visit www.drscore.com.

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We are living in the Internet Age.

A 2011 report from the Sesame Workshop and the Joan Ganz Cooney Center, entitled Always Connected: The new digital media habits of young children, examined the media that are available to and used by children.  The report finds that 60 to 80 percent of households with children have Internet access.  Moreover, even among young children ages 5 to 9 years old, some 50 to 60 percent of children are using the Internet!

It wasn’t that long ago that the idea that patients could rate their medical experiences and publicly share those ratings  seemed to be impossibly difficult and impractical. That idea seems antiquated today.  The ability of a doctor rating website to provide greater transparency of medical quality, to provide representative sampling, and to empower patients to give their doctors feedback depends on patients having Internet access. And that access continues to grow.

Use of the Internet is rapidly becoming ubiquitous.  DrScore.com is proud to be one of the many organizations to take advantage of this opportunity to improve communication and make the previously unimaginable a normal part of our lives.

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Some doctors are totally disgusted with the profusion of online doctor rating websites.  I understand why they feel that way.  As great a career as medicine is, it seems horrible to have to worry about online doctor ratings on top of the years of training, the continuing commitment to ongoing medical education, the trials and tribulations of running an office, and the stresses of caring for sick patients.
Are online doctor rating websites like DrScore.com the bows for patients’ arrows at doctors?  That’s not the way I think of it. DrScore is more of a vase to display to the flowers that patients give the doctors that they appreciate.  The vast, vast majority of patients love their doctors, and online rating is way to make those patients visible.  When doctors see the esteem they are held in by patients, I think it will help doctors renew their commitment to giving patients great medical care.

Doctor’s Day is coming March 30. Give your doctors some flowers for their vase by rating them online at DrScore.com.

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One of the benefits of online doctor rating — a benefit to patients and doctors — is a transparency of medical care quality that will help people identify the bad doctors, the uncaring ones, the ones who, according to some patients, you wouldn’t send your dog to. Patients aren’t the only ones who know about these doctors.  Doctors know about them too. They have seen patients who were seen by these colleagues, and all of those patients were unhappy with the care they received.

I know that online doctor rating isn’t going to find many such doctors.  In fact, quite the opposite, online rating of physicians is going to show there aren’t nearly so many “bad doctors” out there as people think there are. Let me explain.

I’m a practicing dermatologist.  I see patients who have seen another dermatologist in town, maybe a dozen or so of that doctor’s patients.  Every one of those patients was unhappy with the care they received, and none of those patients received treatment that cured their condition.

Now that’s clear evidence the other dermatologist didn’t know what they were doing, right?

No, not right.  You see, every time that other dermatologist clears up his or her patient’s rash and gives his or her patient a medical care experience the patient is happy with, that patient continues seeing the other dermatologist and doesn’t come see me.  I  see that doctor’s outliers, the occasional patient who, for whatever reason, didn’t get better or who was unhappy.  I’m sure that the other dermatologist sees a few of my former patients too, only the ones whom I didn’t cure, only the ones who were unhappy with me.  Our observations give us a misleading picture of other people.

Well what about those doctors whose patients post comments like, “I wouldn’t send my dog to that doctor?”  That kind of comment does happen, and, sadly, I’m sure that’s the true opinion of the patient who makes that comment.  But those comments are generally not anywhere close to representative of what the vast majority of that doctor’s patients think.  I get comments like that at times (thankfully less often than I used to, having learned from patient satisfaction feedback what I was doing wrong).  I’ve been rated over 500 times on DrScore.com.  The average of those scores is 9.1 out of 10 (not bad, according to my mom).  Still, occasional patients give me a 0 or a 1 for their experience.  I know they may think everyone gives me a 0 or 1, that I’m a “bad doctor,” but the great majority of my patients think I’m a 9 or 10.  So far, that’s true for all the doctors with just 10 or more ratings on DrScore.

There may be “bad doctors” out there, but I suspect they are incredibly rare.  There weren’t any in my medical school class, and I have yet to meet one in person.  If there are any, I hope we do smoke them out with online ratings.  If they exist, maybe the online scrutiny will wake them up to the need to improve the quality of care they offer.

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Researchers from the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have found that beneficiaries of Medicare who live in areas with a “larger supply of doctors” are not any more likely to be satisfied with the physician care they receive or the time they spend with their doctors than Medicare recipients who live in regions with smaller pools of physicians. Additionally, the study “found no significant differences in access to specialists or availability of tests.

This isn’t surprising.  At DrScore, we’ve found that seeing a caring, friendly doctor is the critical factor in patient satisfaction.  Having more doctors won’t make patients happier, but having more empathetic doctors who show how much they care about their patients does.

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t’s great to see that people are accessing DrScore research and hopefully putting it to use to make sure patients get the best possible medical care.

Dear Dr Feldman:

Re: Your paper published in Patient Related Outcome Measures

I wanted to let you know that your paper, “Patient satisfaction with obstetricians and gynecologists compared with other specialties: analysis of US self-reported survey data”, has been well received since it went online.

Total views: 576

URL: http://www.dovepress.com/articles.php?article_id=6063&l=ItAn0uejcIr9quaxAks7RURS20272

Weeks Since Published: 4

Best regards

Ms. Olliver
Dove Medical Press
2G, 5 Ceres Court, Mairangi Bay, Auckland, New Zealand.
PO Box 300-008, Albany, Auckland, New Zealand.

www.dovepress.com – open access to scientific and medical research

[15747]


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Delta Airlines in-flight magazine included a review of wine and business expert Gary Vaynerchuk’s book, The Thank You Economy.  The review said that customer service today is generally poor and that social media will make bad service a much bigger deal.  But it is a double-edged sword: companies can also use social media to give their customers a more personal experience.

This is all half-right when it comes to medical care.  Doctors are giving their patients great medical care day in, day out.  But it isn’t always perfect, and at times patients feel their care is lacking.  The Internet and social media can make mountains out of the negative experiences, ruining doctors’ online reputations.

The key is how to use the Internet to nip the problems in the bud, not by trying to “paper over” the problem with online reputation building services but by actually improving the quality of care and making the quality of care more transparent.

DrScore does both these things.  First, by giving doctors an easy, low cost way to get detailed feedback, DrScore gives doctors the information they need to do what they want to do, to give every patient a truly outstanding medical experience.  In addition, by making doctors’ overall scores transparent to the public, DrScore lets patients see a more representative picture of U.S. medical care.

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I recently returned from a trip to a national medical meeting at which I was invited to speak in a session titled, “Managing Your Online Reputation.”  The first guest speaker talked about personal experiences of being skewered online, and the second speaker talked about doctor rating sites in general and how those sites are a jungle of mean-spirited, libelous trashing of physicians.  Worse yet, the audience had come expecting that kind of discussion about online sites and desperately wanted to know what could be done to put an end to online doctor rating.

Now that’s my kind of audience!  I’m not someone who wants to preach to the choir.

My presentation went very well.  I started by explaining why I, a doctor, would start an online doctor rating site. I explained  the value of getting feedback from patients and described how that feedback has made me a better doctor. I also demonstrated how transparency actually helps improve doctors’ reputations in the community.

I think I won over most — if not all the doctors — to the idea that DrScore does online rating the right way and is a positive development for both patients and their doctors.  (At least I know I convinced those doctors who came up afterward to tell me what they thought of the talk.)  Some of the doctors who attended the session decided to sign up to use the DrScore.com patient satisfaction reporting service as a way to get feedback from their patients.

It is heartening to know that doctors can see the value in getting patient feedback and that at DrScore we’ve created an easyk inexpensive way for doctors to get that feedback as a tool to assist them in improving patient satisfaction.

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